Playing House

By Octavio Quintanilla My seven-year-old wife has dinner ready for me by the time I come home. I’m a year older than she is and we have two children, though we are not sure of how we got them. After dinner, and after the small talk, we send them off to bed. They wed their […]

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Sunflower Stems/Notes From the Reckoning

By Noelle Barrera On the first day, we were surprised when the moths started raining down from the sky. We were standing on sidewalks, drinking coffee in dimly-lit rooms, walking with friends on the streets when they started dropping down from trees — with vivid punctured red-green bodies, dead moths the size of dogs, the […]

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Collection by JJ Philips

By JJ Philips JJ Philips (Jeanine Johnson-Philips) pursued art from middle school through college, but after getting married and raising a family, art was put on the back burner. By the time her children were older, she toyed around with the idea of revisiting her artistic side, but being a full-time employee, there just didn’t […]

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Dear Friend

By Kara Killinger I wish you could stay longer. I’ll never admit it, but I’d let you be here all the time if that was what you wanted. You could eat my canned peaches, drink my boxed wine, sleep in my bed, lounge on the couch over there, and just always be looking at me. […]

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Treasure Hunting

By Kara Killinger When Pop takes you and Kenneth to roam the thin strip of sand between the grass and the lake, you will find treasures including a red and white bobber, broken sunglasses, and a fishing lure shaped like a strange worm. You will put the treasures in a bucket to show Momma and […]

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Dust

By Natalie Rogers I was just a speck of dust on the wall. I’ve lived here for 1,752 days, but what did I really know? I had no central nervous system. I had no brain. I didn’t even have a body. I was a mass of tangled long hairs and dead skin cells; so very […]

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A Brother’s Responsibility

By Joy Umoekpo It all started a few months ago on a normal day. Trent had just finished some biology homework from his college and was preparing to pick up his younger brother Edwin from his classes when he received the phone call. His mouth fell open. His car keys fell from his hands and […]

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A Testimony About Love

By Adam Toler Finding a topic for a Christian talk is always complicated. After all, Christianity has been around for centuries, and novelty is a bit hard to come by – most of the time, your audience can guess your direction right off the bat. I was praying about it, but I had a fairly even-keel summer break […]

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Rock-n-Roll Hearts and Trains

By Angela Carlton Music saved her. While her father was strung-out, sleeping the days away, it was music that saved her, sharp melodies, those catchy little lyrics that landed inside a song. It lifted her. Sometimes he’d take five pills, six, as many as ten a day for the pain. Her father, Daddy Ted, was […]

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Door Signs

By Margaret Rozga No shirt, no shoes, no service Please close door securely Emergency Exit Authorized Personnel Only Do Not Disturb Do Not Enter Closed Until Further Notice Closed Exit No firearms allowed Enter Open Pull Key available at service desk Women Men Push Men/Women/Family Welcome Wisconsin Poet Laureate Dr. Margaret Rozga creates poetry from […]

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Peace is Relative

By Dylan Lopez For many, peace is a broken rifle scatteredover the dried, blood-clot Field in Flanderswhere trench poppies bloom brass shellsand thick mud washes clean off the milk-whiteheadstones—graves twice-filled with those namelesswho cry peace at last, from their green hollows. Peace is winged victory and hoisted flags hung off the bow of a battleship’s […]

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The Real HarMar Superstar

By Zach Murphy Semisonic’s melancholy anthem “Closing Time” plays while Steve finishes up his last night as a security guard at HarMar Mall. This is almost too good to be true, he thinks to himself. The unsung hero gazes at his reflection in the Famous Footwear window. He’s kept in great shape, he’s clean-shaven, and […]

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Crossing the Harbor Bridge

By Dylan Lopez IAgainst the foreign hour’s demands I am here with you; a transient tied, Truant of time. A steward to the innumerable imagined, the generations yet embarked. Just as you feel the searing touch of the sun emblazed, so I felt. Just as any of you have known the shimmering coastal reveries, so […]

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Changing Faces

By Ruby Walker I I want to tell you a story without all the bad parts I want to squeeze out the sinking black phlegm of that sad prologue, that pity party, the melodrama of an unspoken plea, please don’t leave me I’m scared of what I’ll think when I’m alone Firefly street lamps flicking […]

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It Ended Up a Sonnet

By Jordan Tate Maybe if we had bought our bandsany other time but our second dateany other place but the local Walmartany other mood but deeply arousedby now we might’ve been divorcedMaybe the trick was doing somethingwith the love of a gambler and faithof a junky so that despite our intentionseven the pawn shops wouldn’t […]

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Eagle Feathers

By Jesse Manciaz (Xam’le Kuiz, Red Feather) I sense it in the streets I hear it in their voices when they speak I feel it in my bones when they gather in the night I see it in their faces with their torches bright When they light their burning crosses more freely than before When […]

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Jungle

(about PTSD) By Jesse Manciaz (Xam’le Kuiz, Red Feather) I survived the jungle which tore into me a living thorn that ripped my flesh and infected my mind with, sorrow, regret, and scorn But I survived the jungle When I’m alone in the quiet, I sit on the edge of my bed In darkness, all […]

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Saved

By Margaret Rozga Yesterday’s sky greyed. Then when we looked up from lunch, rain, the lake’s brusque blue dimpling. We allowed ourselves a lull, sipped coffee. Seagulls circled beyond the walls of windows. Later in the brief sun we walked, found on a park bench a scattering of leaflets, drenched, ink-smeared, dark, still readable: What […]

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Listen

By Robin Bissett “Listen,” you began. Your lies—a desperate spider’s last few threads—stretched from the wide windows to the hopelessly patterned carpet. As you weaved and swung, sharing your story, I saw your joyless eyes search mine for signs of submission. Your smile composed of untrimmed fence posts, cracked rocks that I’d scraped my knees […]

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February 14, 2018

By Alan Berecka Valentine’s Day fell that year, fell on Ash Wednesday. A calendar’s quirk—the human condition in a Hallmark moment: “Ashes to ashes, Lust to lust.” Alan Berecka resides in Sinton, Texas. He earns his keep as a librarian at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi. His work has appeared in such places as […]

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A Job Certainty

By Alan Berecka Riding on the running board at the back of the garbage truck was always cooler than sitting in the un-air-conditioned cab, so one hot July afternoon as we cruised down Commercial Boulevard, I was hanging out and on, mindlessly enjoying the breeze, when two girls I had gone to high school with, […]

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A Working Manifesto

By Alan Berecka To you, O sycophants and brownnosers, you know-it-all kibitzers, you goody-two-shoed darlings of our supervisors, you puritanical drones shackled by guilt to your self-flagellating ethos, and all you other irritants who have chaffed me raw in every workplace I have inhabited, I say to you, nay I plead with you, Relax! And […]

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Our Trespasses

By Alan Berecka Ken Hada’s place sits squarely in the middle of nowhere, so he wonders how it is an older couple knew to climb his fence and find the tree and its dark orange fruit. He writes the question into a poem, one of my favorites, and leaves the reader without an answer. Today […]

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777

By Gloria Bueno May the aroma of the sage disinfect the negative energy––you claim lingers and haunts your sacred space Each circular sway is that in-itself a prayer to cleanse for the new Moving out the unholy grime that made way in the crevices of your home. How about manifesting a soul mate? New Year’s: […]

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Los Dìas Oscuros

By Octavio Quintanilla Octavio Quintanilla is author of the poetry collection, If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014) and of several chapbooks, the most recent titled, Wasted Time (Alabrava 2019). He teaches Literature and Creative Writing in the M.A./M.F.A. program at Our Lady of the Lake University. He is the 2018-2020 Poet Laureate of San […]

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A Mirrorless Self-Portrait

By Leilani Cabello Leilani Cabello is a self-taught artist from Corpus Christi, Texas. She will be a college freshman at the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 2020 where she will continue her passion for drawing and painting through a Studio Arts major in the College of Fine Arts. Leilani uses a […]

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Overgrowth

By Leilani Cabello Leilani Cabello is a self-taught artist from Corpus Christi, Texas. She will be a college freshman at the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 2020 where she will continue her passion for drawing and painting through a Studio Arts major in the College of Fine Arts. Leilani uses a […]

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Keep Out

By Leilani Cabello Leilani Cabello is a self-taught artist from Corpus Christi, Texas. She will be a college freshman at the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 2020 where she will continue her passion for drawing and painting through a Studio Arts major in the College of Fine Arts. Leilani uses a […]

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Violation of Sacred Space

By Riley King Every day life seems too mundane, but when you pull back the curtain it’s unsettling and violating. Some of our most traumatizing moments revisit us like a fever dream. Even though we try to make sense of the chaos, every photo is like a beautifully uncomfortable return to a nightmare. Riley King […]

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Breathing Down the Back of Your Neck

By Riley King Every day life seems too mundane, but when you pull back the curtain it’s unsettling and violating. Some of our most traumatizing moments revisit us like a fever dream. Even though we try to make sense of the chaos, every photo is like a beautifully uncomfortable return to a nightmare. Riley King […]

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Pollination

By Mauro de la Tierra 36 x 48 in. (acrylic, spray paint, oil on canvas, human blood) A color palette and subject matter inspired by my Mexican heritage. A guide sits ready to lead us to our next lives. Our decomposing bodies bloom into flowers. A symbol of nature’s cycle of life, death, and rebirth. […]

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Los Niños Moribundos

By Mauro de la Tierra The giraffe population has fallen by nearly 50% in the last 30 years from habitat loss and hunting. I’m deeply saddened by our probable loss of these mesmerizing and majestic creatures. Inside the incinerating giraffe lies a nest with a skeleton, a cracked egg, and a baby bird to symbolize […]

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Eclectic Blue

By Sontonya Davis This piece is a part of Sontonya’s “Eclectic BlAk” series from her first solo exhibit. It’s a colorful representation of life, love, and the afterlife in honor of her late son, Rashaun Donaldson. Sontonya Davis is an author and artist, as well as a Certified Career Coach, Certified Grief Coach, and Certified […]

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Steady Love

By Sontonya Davis This piece represents the multiple layers and complexity of love. The broken glass in the piece gives light to the brokenness and pain often experienced in love.This piece was influenced by the song by India Arie called “Steady Love”. Sontonya Davis is an author and artist, as well as a Certified Career […]

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Dirty Diana

By Sontonya Davis She depicts a woman’s sassiness, toughness, beauty, strength, and focus. She gives us a visual perspective of how beautiful it is to honestly be who we are meant to be, even if it’s not perfect. Sontonya Davis is an author and artist, as well as a Certified Career Coach, Certified Grief Coach, […]

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A View of My Past

By Sontonya Davis This piece represents the history and traditions of African Americans once they were brought to America. Sontonya Davis is an author and artist, as well as a Certified Career Coach, Certified Grief Coach, and Certified Life Coach. Through the recent death of her son, Sontonya has felt inspired to help others cope […]

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Tragic

By Gloria Bueno In H A I K U format, this UNATTRACTIVE visual poem expressesthe idea that many personal transformations are BIRTHED fromTRAGIC situations, whether from first-hand experiences or throughobservation. Some may consider their lives to be a constant tragedy, but others are willing to find blessings in disguise from “UGLY” situations and SHED their […]

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Pivot

By Kiera Counce Kiera Counce was born in Kansas City and grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. Now, she is taking on graphic design and poetry. She has been dedicated to her craft since 2013, and has grown a worldwide audience.

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Distinct Traits

By Kiera Counce Kiera Counce was born in Kansas City and grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. Now, she is taking on graphic design and poetry. She has been dedicated to her craft since 2013, and has grown a worldwide audience.

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The Garden

By Kiera Counce Kiera Counce was born in Kansas City and grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. Now, she is taking on graphic design and poetry. She has been dedicated to her craft since 2013, and has grown a worldwide audience.

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Tender

By Robin Bissett Robin Bissett (she/her) is a writer, artist, and senior at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. Find her on instagram @robintbissett.

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A Gross, Happy Proposal

By Heather Wyatt I never thought I’d marry my ex-boyfriend. I only have one real ex-boyfriend. You know, the one that guts you, changes you, teaches you. That one. He taught me a lot about the things I wanted and didn’t want out of a relationship.  But I never really considered marrying him. I knew […]

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Noiselessness

By Anonymous When I was young, I never kept track of how much my father had to drink on any particular night. Unintentionally, or perhaps even subconsciously, I carefully trained myself to look the other way when the liquor began to stain the corners of his mouth. I learned to keep my distance from him […]

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Shorebound

Cora stands at the edge of a cliff and stares through wind-narrowed eyes at the hidden ocean. Somewhere far below her feet, white waves seethe and foam onto the black-rock beach, a destructive dance to which she is a precarious observer. She can taste the water on her skin, too, bitterly cold and salty, burrowing […]

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Birth of a Song

Mandy Campbell Resting Place (Lyrics) Melted wax and soot from candlesWater stains and a broken handleMar the wooden table by our bedBut all I see is your golden wedding ringIt’s been awhile since I looked at picturesWhen the gleam in your eye still flickeredBefore the pain and the endless medsMade this empty space permanent between […]

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Some Distant Music

Courtney Justus My House This house I live in is not my own. Two stories, colonial style, in northwest Houston, wooden floors like my dance studio, plus a wide, metallic gate and a garden through which I rarely walk, because Mr. Martínez, the owner, a balding man in round glasses, told me there were snakes. […]

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Speechless

Mafer Benavides “Mey-feer? Mahr-fahyër?” the tournament judge called squinting her eyes, trying to find the spelling error, even though there was no error. “It’s Mafer. It’s a nickname for my full name, Maria Fernanda.” She stared at me blankly. “My parents are creative,” I lied, and she laughed. “Okay, Mahfeer, you’re up!” I walk to […]

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Mis Amores

Translation: Mis amores Where do all my lovers goafter they leave my bed?Some of them point to the west,others point to the north, and I am unsure of what star to follow.  Tonight, I hear the wolf’s shadow rise over the church I abandoned. It lengthens with each love that forswears to pray me back.  Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the […]

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Tengo un amor que me espiaì

By Octavio Quintanilla Translation: Tengo un amor que me espiá She spies on methrough the windowwhen I gab with death.  Watch out.Remember her name: Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014) and the 2018-2020 Poet Laureate of San Antonio, TX. His poetry, fiction, translations, and photography have […]

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La Muerte

Octavio Quintanilla like my father’s cornfield in the last days of July    like the smile of the girl  who rejected me when I was eight  like the taste of beer after being unfaithfullike the taste of God after cursing Him  Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If I Go Missing (Slough […]

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Mi lujuria como la voz de Dios

Octavio Quintanilla Translation: Not necessary to be transformed Into a bull Nor dress in an angel’s furEach commandment A vise for youBut for me ten ways of boastingMy power Still you’re the dark voice Grieving in the desertThe body’s bellow Profane water gushing Between my three brains Among all things Blessed is your love  Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If […]

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Hello?

Ariel Del Vecchio This work is a conversation between a person and the emotions they try to ignore. Ariel del Vecchio is an artist currently living and working in San Antonio Texas.

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Hallucinating Sober

Matthew Tavares Walking the floor of my classroom during a standardized test I notice the graphic on the back of a student’s black hoodie. A man of bones holds out a rose on the edge of the moon. Outside, I stretch one arm towards the sky, reaching to catch the falling petals. There is a […]

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Is This What You Wanted?

Jared Claudio Tincher Coming out to loved ones can be agonizing to prepare for. Regardless of how it will turn out, you have to seriously, honestly ask yourself, “How unconditional is this person’s love for me?” And you have to be prepared for the answer to be, “Not at all.”So a lot of trans people […]

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Georgia on My Mind

Charles “Chuck” Taylor This is before he met Georgia, this is back in the late 1960’s when Georgia is married to Al and they live in El Paso, this is when Georgia quit working her legal secretary job and let go of the Mexican maid to stay home with her kids while her husband Al […]

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The Spirit of Capitalism

Michael C. Taylor “I have $120,000 of student loan debt,” the public school teacher, a single mother, casually mentioned to us over brunch. “I have no way of ever paying it back.” She took my breath away. We shouldn’t all be eating out like this together, I realized. Her kid playing with my kids. The […]

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Dear Friend, I can’t Tell You

Ruby Walker Ruby Walker is an 18-year-old artist and writer. She grew up in Austin, Texas, moved down to Buda, dropped out of high school, did a few other things, and is currently studying art at Trinity University in San Antonio. Her first illustrated book, Advice I Ignored: Stories and Wisdom from a Formerly Depressed […]

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Selfless Care Series

Elyse Andrews I am not a confrontational person, and these pieces were created around the time I needed to have some conversations I really did not want to have. This whole situation made me incredibly anxious, most of the year. At the same time, I had three banana plants growing in my apartment that were […]

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Twenty Who?

John Puga According to a Department of Veterans Affairs study, over 20 veterans take their own lives each day. This piece explores the hidden suffering that current and former military members deal with. Who will be the next? We may never know until it’s too late. John Puga is a San Antonio based artist who […]

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How We Learn To Talk About Tragedy

Emily Bourgeois Emily Josephine Bourgeois is a poet and student who is Washington born, Nebraska raised, and living in San Antonio for now. While she mostly focuses on spoken word, more of her written work can be found in past editions of the Trinity Review. She believes in the radical potential of storytelling and can […]

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The Ouse River Flows in Juárez

Matthew Tavares   “It was reported her hat and cane had  been found on the bank of the Ouse River.  Mrs. Woolf had been ill for some time.” -New York Times article from April 3rd, 1941 The locusts float like smoke in the still air. Silence chokes the girl lying on the sheetless mattress. Sweat […]

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Fester

Veronica Gonzalez This piece is about the opioid crisis and how addiction can affect any individual regardless of race, religion, or class. Veronica Gonzalez was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas. She is currently in her third year of obtaining her BFA at Southwest School of Art. She has two children and is an […]

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Holy

Kierstin Wilkins I rinse my hand under running water and           just                    like                             that, staring at the mirror,                I am made new. It doesn’t matter that this is not a church, or that I am not praying to God. In this moment of appreciation, I am praying to myself […]

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She Took the First Breath in Salt Water

Stephanie Rao if when you slice open an infant’s belly             and water spills in the pints meant for blood, then that baby seeks hospitality and home, not             haven. a place reserved for the dead. the baby’s fingers have pruned and lost their             softnesss, the defining infant trait. she has been afloat yellow […]

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Everything’s Fine

Veronica Gonzalez This piece is about my personal struggles with depression and anxiety.  It is about being prescribed medication to help with these struggles but when the medication is not taken it causes symptoms of withdrawal. Life continues to go on and I have to figure out how to go on being happy for my […]

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Familiar Coven

Mackenzie Cook I find myself in tellingspeaking from a dead woman’s mouthshe forms “God”I spit it out “gay”this woman is stilllooming over her own bedstaring down at my grandmother who tells her“Mama, you are the most beautiful womanmore beautiful than the sun.”than the silk scarves draped over the bedto pay for last month’s cans of […]

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A Trick Of The Shadows

Eve Kerrigan Dot woke to the sound of the phonograph. She sat up in bed for along moment, blinking her eyes, trying to make sense of the sound.It was incongruous with the long shadows that the moonlight castas it poured through the narrow opening of her bedroom curtains.She shivered a little in the dark. Her […]

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A Loss Whose Color I Picked

Lutfi Sun I lost a journal, a milky coffee colored journal that I kept in the 10th grade. She had a name, “the notebook whose color I picked.” Now, thinking about her name, I guess making that decision at the time meant to me that I was a grown up. I had the money and […]

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Surveillance

Izabella Flores This piece embodies the irony behind the fact that cameras and technology, tools created to assist us in our daily lives, have now become a cause for fear that our personal information and lives are constantly being watched. An odd situation to be in and a strange conversation to have. Izabella Flores is […]

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Mask

Kian Rodriguez This piece is about depression, which can spark many difficult conversations such as when you have to tell your therapist how you feel. Kian Rodriguez is a self-taught artist from New Braunfels, Texas. His preferred mediums are ink, watercolor, acrylic, and graphite. He works as an assistant dance teacher and enjoys listening to […]

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Assumptions

Jennifer Jussel For the purposes of this essay, I’m assuming that you are dead. My sincerest condolences. Let’s say that, for now, how you died is not an important question. For our purposes, let’s say the moment you started reading was your last. It’s perfectly plausible, after all. Death can be terribly random. Sometimes, our […]

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The New American Flag

John Puga In a time of mass shooting, this piece explores the current state of American gun culture. John Puga is a San Antonio based artist who has been studying photography, art, and design for over 18-years. He has a B.F.A. in Computer Graphic Arts (2012) and an M.A. in Communication Arts (2016) from the […]

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Butterflies

Kian Rodriguez This piece is a take on the idea of having butterflies in your tummy. It can be interpreted as when some people find it difficult to say “I love you” or when you’re talking to someone you like.  Kian Rodriguez is a self-taught artist from New Braunfels, Texas. His preferred mediums are ink, […]

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Shackled

Izabella Flores This piece is representative of an abusive relationship, both figuratively and literally. Having a conversation over such a thing is considered almost “taboo,” and while solving the issue may seem simple (e.g. cutting off the abuser), it’s never easy. Izabella Flores is a high school senior who mainly works with 2D design and […]

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Hands

Kian Rodriguez This piece is about how I don’t like people touching me, and the conversation that can stem from having to tell them this. Kian Rodriguez is a self-taught artist from New Braunfels, Texas. His preferred mediums are ink, watercolor, acrylic, and graphite. He works as an assistant dance teacher and enjoys listening to […]

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This Is Where We Take Our Birth Control – Careful Around the Ankles – I’m Held Together with a Thin Thread of Green String – Jessie’s Sink

Kristina Reinis This Is Where We Take Our Birth Control Careful Around the Ankles I’m Held Together with a Thin Thread of Green String Jessie’s Sink In Western culture, the home has been traditionally understood as a female-gendered space. However, while the domestic space is still one associated with traditions of femininity, over time it […]

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Whale

Cailtlin R. Foster My piece was created with environmental concern, particularly our oceans.The bright neon colors and coral are supposed to represent the trash that has plagued our oceans. However, the image still appears pleasant and pretty because I believe humanity knows pollution is detrimental but we refuse to really see the effects of our […]

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La Tua Mama

Loretta Rodriguez I keep thinking about this one time in Florence with your mom. The three of us were walking home from the little grocery store across the street where you bought my brown leather notebook. We were heading to the first apartment, the one with the pretty curtains. I remember we had to push […]

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Un Teléfono Descompuesto

Maria Benavides Como se quiebra mi corazón,como la línea de teléfonoYa no me describes los amanecerescon los que despertabas,los susurros que echaban a volar tu imaginación cuando salías de paseo el miércoles por la tarde,las noticias que te comparten tus vecinas, las golondrinas. ¿Dime, qué fue lo que sucedió? Nuestros veranos difusos y tardados se […]

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American Living

Oscar Alanis My work explores the misperceptions of the American dream. Through my artwork, I talk about the entrapment of participating in the capitalistic society that caters to the rich and works the impoverished to the ground. I use metaphorical images to convey the desperation for materialistic things despite the obstacles to obtain them. My […]

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Mother Earth

Sontonya Davis My work represents who I am as a woman: empowerment, sadness, struggles, strength, humility. It also represents me embracing and accepting my flaws and who I am. Sontonya Davis, CLC, CGC, is an author and artist, as well as a Certified Career Coach, Certified Grief Coach, and Certified Life Coach. Through the recent […]

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You Could Be a Winner!

Samantha Ortiz Poetry Contest Honorable Mention It was the way he slouched in the doorway when he tried to smile and say hello,I asked him what he wanted.I wanted to know quick.I needed to know now.He paused.The ring.What ring? I asked. There is no ring.You know about the ring.He tore apart my roomripping every poster […]

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The Year-Round Season

Casper Smith It starts on a day so hazy you can hardly see your backyard. It’s as though you live in a void of toxic smog where tall shadowy figures move just beyond the artificial horizon. You can hear murmurs of an unknown language, but never intelligible. Your home—house—looks to be in order, but something […]

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Doc, What’s Wrong?

Kierstin Wilkins Poetry Contest Honorable Mention Doc, What’s Wrong?Doc, my own dreams keep attacking me.I wake up, stung, at least once a week. What’s causing my pain? It seems an unhealed exit wound is to blame.Do you know what that could be about? An itch to pick the scab of her just won’t go away.I […]

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Death Survivor

Mandy Campbell Last March, Spring Break. I can feel it coming as I leave the city limits on my way to a long- planned vacation with the kids. It’s a growing sense of trepidation, hovering over me, threatening like a black wave, trembling in place, poised to wreck its ruin. It overshadows everything, swirling up […]

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For the Roaches

Charles “Chuck” Taylor These little terrorists, the brown oblong kind, not so smart; the blacker, smaller, rounder ones, dodging whatever you pick up to smash them, BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, on the kitchen countertop, inside the bread box, around the bathroom sink and tub, BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, hiding on the underside of drawers, you can tell […]

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Headlights

T. Mesnick | Her boyfriend smelled like gasoline. This wasn’t normal—he usually smelled like warm bread, and it was the most attractive thing about him—but in this moment she tried to breathe shallowly to avoid the bitter stinging of the odor in her throat as she rested her head on his shoulder.

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John/John

Ariana Fletcher-Bai | My high school senior English class acted out every play we read, as a rule. In the second semester, we read Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. I somehow made it to the end of the fourth act
without being called on. It was a miracle.

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The Universe In Her

Magdalen Nicole Cheatham | She spoke to me of the universe, / and I revealed that it scared me. / She marveled at how it continued to expand / and told me that was her favorite part.

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The Journey

Deb Wesloh | It’s time to dust again. I used to enjoy it…okay…let’s just say I tolerated it. However, since I recently finished my breast cancer chemo treatments, dusting the house is now a bit overwhelming.

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Luxury Goods

Brent Oakes Brent Oakes is currently living in San Antonio, Texas. He went to Trinity University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from Trinity University. While finishing his undergraduate degree he took a sculpture course at UTSA and this is where he found enjoyment in working in the plastic arts. Luxury Goods […]

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Wired Up

Brent Oakes Brent Oakes is currently living in San Antonio, Texas. He went to Trinity University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from Trinity University. While finishing his undergraduate degree he took a sculpture course at UTSA and this is where he found enjoyment in working in the plastic arts. Wired Up […]

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Screen Time

Kate Nuelle Kate Nuelle is a sophomore double majoring in art history and studio art. She splits her time between Austin and San Antonio. She is a student assistant for the Visual Resources Center and a photographer for the Mirage Yearbook. Kate is the President of the Trinity Art Collective. Her work has also been […]

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Bust

Julia Poage Julia Poage is a senior English and art double major from Houston, Texas, who lives and works in San Antonio. Her work has been featured in the Art Department’s juried student exhibition, the Mini, as well as the San Antonio Art League’s annual collegiate exhibition. In 2018, she received a Mellon grant, which […]

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A wise man once said—

Marc Swan | A wise man once said— /
The seed that will kill you is already planted. / I’m not a farmer, horticulturist, into agronomy / or raised bed gardens. I tend more toward walks /

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