Mis Amores

Translation: Mis amores Where do all my lovers go after they leave my bed? Some of them point to the west, others point to the north,  and I am unsure of what star  to follow.  Tonight, I hear  the wolf’s shadow rise  over the church I abandoned.  It lengthens with each love  that forswears to […]

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Tengo un amor que me espiaì

Octavio Quintanilla Translation: Tengo un amor que me espiá She spies on me through the window when I gab with death.  Watch out. Remember  her name: Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014) and the 2018-2020 Poet Laureate of San Antonio, TX. His poetry, fiction, translations, […]

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La Muerte

Octavio Quintanilla like my father’s cornfields         in the last days of July       like the smile of the girl         who rejected me when I was eight  like the taste of beer after being unfaithful like the taste of God after cursing Him  Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If I […]

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Mi lujuria como la voz de Dios

Octavio Quintanilla Translation: Not necessary to be transformed  Into a bull  Nor dress in an angel’s fur Each commandment  A vise for you But for me ten ways of boasting My power  Still you’re the dark voice  Grieving in the desert The body’s bellow  Profane water gushing  Between my three brains  Among all things  Blessed […]

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Hallucinating Sober

Matthew Tavares Walking the floor of my classroom during a standardized test I notice the graphic on the back of a student’s black hoodie. A man of bones holds out a rose on the edge of the moon. Outside, I stretch one arm towards the sky, reaching to catch the falling petals. There is a […]

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How We Learn To Talk About Tragedy

Emily Bourgeois Emily Josephine Bourgeois is a poet and student who is Washington born, Nebraska raised, and living in San Antonio for now. While she mostly focuses on spoken word, more of her written work can be found in past editions of the Trinity Review. She believes in the radical potential of storytelling and can […]

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The Ouse River Flows in Juárez

Matthew Tavares   “It was reported her hat and cane had  been found on the bank of the Ouse River.  Mrs. Woolf had been ill for some time.” -New York Times article from April 3rd, 1941 The locusts float like smoke in the still air. Silence chokes the girl lying on the sheetless mattress. Sweat […]

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