Playing House

By Octavio Quintanilla My seven-year-old wife has dinner ready for me by the time I come home. I’m a year older than she is and we have two children, though we are not sure of how we got them. After dinner, and after the small talk, we send them off to bed. They wed their […]

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Our Trespasses

By Alan Berecka Ken Hada’s place sits squarely in the middle of nowhere, so he wonders how it is an older couple knew to climb his fence and find the tree and its dark orange fruit. He writes the question into a poem, one of my favorites, and leaves the reader without an answer. Today […]

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Breathing Down the Back of Your Neck

By Riley King Every day life seems too mundane, but when you pull back the curtain it’s unsettling and violating. Some of our most traumatizing moments revisit us like a fever dream. Even though we try to make sense of the chaos, every photo is like a beautifully uncomfortable return to a nightmare. Riley King […]

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A Working Manifesto

By Alan Berecka To you, O sycophants and brownnosers, you know-it-all kibitzers, you goody-two-shoed darlings of our supervisors, you puritanical drones shackled by guilt to your self-flagellating ethos, and all you other irritants who have chaffed me raw in every workplace I have inhabited, I say to you, nay I plead with you, Relax! And […]

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The Garden

By Kiera Counce Kiera Counce was born in Kansas City and grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. Now, she is taking on graphic design and poetry. She has been dedicated to her craft since 2013, and has grown a worldwide audience.

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Peace is Relative

By Dylan Lopez For many, peace is a broken rifle scatteredover the dried, blood-clot Field in Flanderswhere trench poppies bloom brass shellsand thick mud washes clean off the milk-whiteheadstones—graves twice-filled with those namelesswho cry peace at last, from their green hollows. Peace is winged victory and hoisted flags hung off the bow of a battleship’s […]

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